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5 Sales Myths that Undermine Marketing

404H.jpgIf you haven't already noticed, the sales paradigm is getting quite a shake up. It's theinevitable result of two factors: Google's prevalence and the advent of inbound marketing strategies.

At this stage in the game, companies need to begin thinking in terms of inbound sales, which has turned the legacy sales model upside down and sideways.

5 Sales Myths that Undermine Marketing

In theory, marketing and sales have never been more unified, but you wouldn't know that if you peeked into the very separate sales/marketing divide that seem to permeate contemporary business culture. Rather than sales and marketing, it can feel more like sales versus marketing - and that can cause a lot of unnecessary friction.

Be diligent about correcting these 5 sales myths that can wind up undermining marketing.

Myth One: Sales professionals are the only people who understand selling

In fact, marketers have to do a whole lotta research to figure out what makes buyers tick - or not tick - in order to create content that converts. As a result, they developing sales expertise along the way.

Keep in mind that any superiority complexes on either side of the soon-to-be-diminished divide winds up hurting the company as a whole. The more you can unify sales and marketing missions - via joint meetings and ventures - the more likely these two sides are to cultivate respect for each others' various strengths and expertise.

Myth Two: Sales knows more about the company's products and services because marketing is only advertising

Perhaps this was true at one time. However, in order to create the very detail- and fact-based content today's buyers rely on to conduct online research, marketing professionals learn a tremendous amount of detailed information about the company's products and services. Odds are, the average marketer knows as much as a sales rep does, so this is another thing they have in common.

Myth 3: Sales doesn't have time to handle social media stuff; that's marketing's job.

Today's buyers aren't looking for information via contact with sales reps. Instead, they find most of the information they need online, through Google searches. What they need from sales is serious nurturing at whatever stage of the buying cycle they're at - and this will require personalized sales engagement and interaction with buyers via social media, among other angles.

Myth 4: Sales is a numbers game

Actually, sales is more of a people game in which numbers tell a powerful story. Inbound marketing professionals understand this - and can balance both people and numbers in profound ways.

This might be a good time for sales and marketing to get together to discuss the ways data and analytics can be used by both sides to hone in on more layered and detailed buyer personas and to create ever more personalized inbound sales and marketing content.

Myth 5: Anyone can be a marketer; sales success requires serious industry experience

Industry experience will give anyone a leg up when they first come on board because they're familiar with general product info, language and terminology. After that, however, outdated habits will stand in the way of sales success. The best sales professionals are sensitive and intuitive, able to adapt to where prospects or buyers are at any point in the process.

After sales and marketing are more on the same page regarding inbound methodology and context-based prospect/buyer interactions, it might be an interesting experiment to have individual sales and marketing pros shadow each other for a brief spell. They'll be surprised at how much they have in common, and will probably learn from each other as well.

It's time to stop perpetuating sales myths that further divides - rather than narrows - the gap between two sides that are meant to be symbiotic. What is your company doing to align with today's inbound sales paradigm? It's time to stop perpetuating sales myths that further divides - rather than narrows - the gap between two sides that should be inherently symbiotic. What is your company doing to align with today's inbound sales paradigm?

 

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